Yangon: Temples

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Yangon is filled with hundreds of pagodas and other religious monuments, and you could spend days exploring them. But this was the first leg of our trip and we didn’t want to get temple-fatigue, so we only visited a few.  The following are some of our favorite religious shrines found around the city:

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Eating in Yangon

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Every time we travel out of the country, we get the same warning from our doctor: do not partake in street food.  Each and every single time, we chose to ignore that advice because to me, eating street food is half the fun of travel.  It’s where you get to try the most authentic local cuisine that also just happens to be super affordable.  That’s exactly what we did in Yangon.  Our motto was: forget the pizza and hamburgers (not that there are a lot McDonalds there),  jump in and try something that you won’t be able to get at home. Continue reading

Day 2: On the Road in Yangon

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On our second day we headed to downtown Yangon where you will see countless old colonial buildings in the historical wards.  As a result of the country’s isolation for many years, some parts of Myanmar have remained much like they were a century ago. While the buildings look like they have stood still in time, the streets below are bustling with modern day activity. The store fronts are open for business while cars and people jostle to pass through the narrow roads.

Day 1: On the Road in Yangon

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After flying for two days, we finally made it to Yangon.  We’ve only been here for a day and we’re already head over heels in love with this country.  As my mom likes to point out  “you like everywhere you go”, which is true, but there is also something special about this place.  At first glance, it reminds me a lot of Thailand, especially the golden pagoda and temples.  “Same same but different,” as they say.  Here at Shwedagon Pagoda, instead of hoards of tourists, you’ll see Burmese people in their colorful longyi.  Visiting the pagoda as a family affair.  Even though it’s a sacred religious place, people bring their food and have a family picnic in the temples after praying.